reasonstobefit:

submitted by floatingflocks-of-candleswans


Hilariously I’m actually doing this today. Tough Mudder here I come!

reasonstobefit:

submitted by floatingflocks-of-candleswans

Hilariously I’m actually doing this today. Tough Mudder here I come!


Finals are totally harshing my mellow. WANT TO GO TO THE GYM. Gotta push through this last test, and then get whipped into shape!!

Tough Mudder: Solid Motivation

So I’ve been searching for something other than just looking good in a bikini to get my ass in gear, and motivate me to get in absolute peak physical shape. And by jove, I think I’ve found it.

Behold, Tough Mudder. A 10 to 12 mile, gut wrenching, ball busting, “oh my god I can’t breathe, no wait I can’t move cause I just got hit with a 10,000 volt live wire” endurance run and obstacle course developed by British Special Forces. Check out the video from Nor Cal 2011 here.

From the horse’s mouth: 

Tough Mudder is not your average lame-ass mud run or spirit-crushing ‘endurance’ road race. Our 10-12 mile obstacle courses are designed by British Special Forces to test all around strength, stamina, mental grit, and camaraderie. Forget finish times. Simply completing a Tough Mudder is a badge of honor. With the best obstacles and the most innovative courses, it’s no surprise that Tough Mudder has ten times more participants than any other mud run and half a million participants globally. 

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So I’m doing it.Because only 25% of their entrants are female. Because 20% of the people who start the run don’t actually cross the finish line, and I refuse to be one of them. Because it’s time for a real challenge. Because I’ll be old enough by then to actually DRINK the Dos Equis that they hand me if when I cross that finish line. I’m getting together a team of my friends to at the very least train for it with me, most to actually participate though! We are the “Muddy Buddys”!


Let’s Talk Training

In addition to my current workout regimen, I will be adding in endurance running, more extensive lifting/strength building, cutting out more refined sugars, fats, etc, and changing up my types of workouts; i.e. get the eff out of the gym. 

I’ll be running to the gym every chance I get instead of driving there, and interchanging weekend workouts with interval training on inclined terrain.

Also I’ll be learning how to tolerate being cold, cause you know, the ice bath.

My friends and I tried to use the rainy weather up here in Nor Cal to our advantage this weekend. Here’s the product of that:

The crew :)

My biffle Sabrina on the left, myself on the right :)


The Goal:

Endurance: Run 10-13 miles at a decent pace in about three hours (or less).

Strength: Be able to do the whole strength program as listed here with ease and limited rest breaks.

Tough Mudder: Finish it. Own it. 


Absolutely.

Absolutely.

(via get-motivation)



I have this reoccurring dream about having a six pack…Want it now!!

Is this supposed to make me feel better about eating chocolate? Cause it might work. No, must resist!!!!

Is this supposed to make me feel better about eating chocolate? Cause it might work. No, must resist!!!!


Workout Tip: Dumbbell Press

So my awesome friend Matt and I got together last night after kickboxing and lifted weights. He shared one of my personal favorite lifts for chest/pectoral muscle building; the Dumbbell Press. We recorded a video at the gym, but the sound isn’t wonderful so I’ll highlight the basics here:

So basically a dumbbell press is like a regular bench press where you lay back on the bench and use the barbell, and push it up to arms length away, and then bring it back down to your chest. With this exercise we prefer to use dumbbells because with the long barbell, many people have a side that they favor over the other, which provides for uneven muscle building. Dumbbells force the user to push with even force on both sides. 

This particular exercise is great for building the outside portion of the pectoral muscle:

Outer Pec

Find a weight that is good for you—it’s recommended that you be able to reach about 10 reps or so (usually 8-12). The most important thing is that the last rep that you do makes you push super hard—really uses all of the energy that you have left. If you feel like you’re unable to do at least 8, you should probably go down a weight (go up, if the opposite is true). 

So, the way you’re going to do this is to take your two dumbbells, and lay back on a long flat bench. Bring your arms at collar bone level, about shoulder length apart, forming ninty degree angles with your elbows. It should look like this:

For the lift, you’re going to push up, keeping your hands/arms at about the same level (as though you were lifting a bar). The top of the press will look like this: 

There are a few important items to note:

First, when you bring the weights back down to the original position the ninety degree angle is vital. If you hyper extend your shoulders by bringing your elbows and arms too far down, you can cause yourself injury.

The other thing to remember is to lift slowly. People tend to want to rush through sets of lifting-this can actually cause injury. What Matt and I do is count two seconds up to the extended position, and two seconds down to the beginning position. You’ll save yourself injury, and get more out of the workout!

Thanks again to Matt Vanness for demonstrating, and sharing proper form and tips!

Again here is a link to the video. As we move forward we’ll improve filming and things, but at least you get a thorough demonstration with this! Demonstration Video


My good friend Josh Day doing a lunge into a bicep curl…better known as the Tebow. Thanks to my awesome gym buddy Matt Vanness for sending this to me!! So proud of you guys!

My good friend Josh Day doing a lunge into a bicep curl…better known as the Tebow. Thanks to my awesome gym buddy Matt Vanness for sending this to me!! So proud of you guys!